Buddy Commissions Fresco Of His Great Victory Over Rodent

NEW YORK — Buddy the Cat’s human servant returned home Friday to discover the buzz of craftsmen and smell of fresh paint after the silver tabby commissioned a fresco to celebrate his recent victory over a menacing rodent.

Amid the commotion was Luigi Tettamanzi, 62, one of Italy’s foremost Renaissance revivalists. The artist crouched on one knee, applying fine brush strokes to render the beginnings of a sun beam illuminating a powerful feline form in mid-leap with claws extended.

The fresh plaster had already been painted with a luminous sky blue, and broad strokes outlined the suggestion of mountains and forests in the background.

“You see, yes, I use bright and dramatic colors on the arriccio, paint you very heroic, ah?” Tettamanzi told the famously egotistical feline as they conferred during a break. “Not to worry, my friend. I make sure is okay with you before I apply intonaco, yes.”

At Buddy’s instruction, Tettamanzi had begun to render the mouse as a savage and menacing beast several hundred times its actual size. The painting shows a trail of death and destruction behind the mouse, with terrified onlookers pointing at the majestic feline leaping to engage the monstrous rodent. His outstretched paw connects with the enemy, the strike represented with a brilliant flash of energy in chaotic brush strokes.

A cartouche above the painting identifies it as “The Battle of the Rodential Interloper: Year 7 A.B. Resulting In Glorious Buddesian Victory.”

giantrat
An early concept drawing of the intruder.

For several long moments, Big Buddy could only stare, dumbfounded.

Buuuuud!” the human finally said, incredulity in his voice. “What the hell are you doing?”

The tabby looked up from some concept drawings he was reviewing with Tettamanzi.

“Commemorating my victory, of course,” Buddy replied. “The painting represents my heroic actions that day, when I saved many humans from a sinister and vicious rodent-beast.”

The human sighed.

“No, you did not!” he said. “You slept through the whole thing. You didn’t even know the mouse was here until you woke up from your nap an hour later.”

“Fake news!” Buddy said, turning back to Tettamanzi to confer on palette choices and urge the artist to make him look more muscular.

As of press time the fresco had been extended to a second wall, with a new panel depicting a powerfully built Buddy atop a throne adorned with lion motifs, and humans bending the knee before him as he magnanimously accepts oaths of loyalty.

buddybattleinstructions
A “more accurate” version, according to Buddy, but still not as dramatic as the real battle.

11 thoughts on “Buddy Commissions Fresco Of His Great Victory Over Rodent”

      1. Obviously every detail is true in the magical world of the Buddyverse! Tux and I are humbled by his awesome powers and meowscles!

        Liked by 2 people

    1. Great idea! Something appropriately gallant, like the orchestral music in the opening scene of Gladiator when General Maximus leads the Roman cavalry charge into the heart of the massed Germanic savages. Triumphant horns, swelling strings and booming percussion all providing sonic testament to Buddinese glory. Yes.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Now I have to watch that scene on Youtube … just to make sure it’s majestic enough. There’s a sad lack of majesty these days … thank God for Buddy’s heroics!

        Liked by 1 person

      2. It’s this scene here beginning at around 3:04

        The heroic, deep brass playing Maximus’ theme as he’s leading the cavalry. It was a good 22 or 23 years ago, but I can still remember getting chills watching that scene for the first time in the theater…and of being obsessed with Rome, gladiators, centurions and Roman history after that. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

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